The Latest

Sep 19, 2013

synchronicityn.

Pronunciation:  /ˌsɪŋkrəˈnɪsɪtɪ/

  The name given by the Swiss psychologist, C. G. Jung (1875–1961), to the phenomenon of events which coincide in time and appear meaningfully related but have no discoverable causal connection.

Sep 19, 2013

transubstantiationn.

Pronunciation:  /ˌtrɑːnsəbstænʃɪˈeɪʃən/ˌtræn-/-stænsɪˈeɪʃən/
Forms:  Also transsubstantiation.
Etymology:  < medieval Latin tran(s)substāntiātio… (Show More)

 1. The changing of one substance into another.(Often with allusion to sense 2.)

 

ex. 1872   O. W. Holmes Poet at Breakfast-table xi. 362   It is no longer a wax doll for her, but has undergone a transubstantiation quite as real as that of the Eucharist.

Sep 19, 2013
oldtimefriend:

Kiss now, the revolution can wait. 
by Rennie Ellis
Sep 19, 2013 / 138,553 notes

oldtimefriend:

Kiss now, the revolution can wait.

by Rennie Ellis

Sep 19, 2013
Sep 19, 2013
Sep 19, 2013
…writing a book, especially a book of this
kind (i.e. I’d wanted to write a book on
the color blue for my whole life), has a
certain pain in it—the pain of
manifestation. Every word that gets set
down, every decision made—form,
content, sentence structure, image—
begins to define a work that previously
was a kind of infinitely indeterminate
mental cloud, or beautifully diffuse
physical sensation. As the book comes
into being, I’m often thinking, “this is it?
this is all it’s going to be?” For me, I
think it’s this feeling, rather than that of
not having anything to say, or a terror
of the blank page, that can bring a sort
of writer’s block.
Maggie Nelson (on writing Bluets)
Sep 19, 2013